COLUMNISTS

CASHBOX Contributing Writers

This is where we will feature our contributing writers. Many of these authors have been with CASHBOX since the beginning and we are proud to highlight their work.

COX CONSOLIDATES ATLANTA
ENTERCOM NAMES FORMAT CHIEFS
NY CHIT CHAT QUEEN PENS LAST TALE
REDS EXTEND ON POWERHOUSE WLW-700

HERE'S THE LINK TO JIM ROSE REMEMBERS RADIO FOR:
Friday, November 17, 2017 Issue #1669
http://jimroseremembersradio.com/

 

Ask Your Music Questions!

In Syndication Since 1986

 

TODAY IN POP MUSIC HISTORY–“AMERICAN BANDSTAND’S” FIRST DANCE CONTEST SONG HITS THE TOP

It was the first dance contest song on "American Bandstand." Looking back, it's a good-time rockin' 50's classic...

"At The Hop" by Danny and the Juniors from Philadelphia moved into the #1 spot on the national charts on this day in 1957. Yes, 60 years ago. It would spend seven weeks at the top. For many years, "At The Hop" was the highest debuting first chart single when it roared onto one chart at #23.

Not only did Dick Clark help give the song the boost it needed as Bandstand's first dance contest song, it was Dick Clark's suggestion that Danny and the Juniors change the title for their signature hit from "Do The Bop." So popular was "At The Hop" that the group Sha Na Na sang it at the famous Woodstock concert in 1969.

Meanwhile, Danny and the Juniors followed up "At The Hop" with the top 20 hit, "Rock And Roll Is Here To Stay" in 1958...and it became an anthem for rock and roll music…

Still, Danny And The Juniors never had another top 10 hit but tried with minor hits through 1962.

Sadly, lead singer Danny Rapp was only 41 when he committed suicide in 1983.

Thirty oneyears ago Wednesday (December 27, 1986), this was the #1 song in the USA on “American Top 40"…

"Walk Like An Egyptian" by the Bangles was the #1 song in the USA for the second of its four weeks. It would become the #1 single of 1987.

Even though it was two days after Christmas, Casey Kasem still played "Do They Know It's Christmas" by Band Aid as an extra, noting that Bob Geldoff was nominated for a Nobel Peace prize as part of the project.

To tie in with "You Be Illin'" by Run-D.M.C. at #29, Casey noted how producer Rick Rubin was "the real king of rap." Also in Hour two at #24 was "You Give Love A Bad Name" as Casey told the story of how Jon Bon Jovi used to sweep floors at New York's Power Station Studios.

Casey also did an update on the Tornadoes, the first British group to have a USA #1 single (with "Telstar" in 1962-63). Plus, in a question letter, it was noted that the performer with the most Top 10 albums...at the time was Frank Sinatra.

One of the three Long Distance Dedications was one the writer dedicated to herself: "Human" by the Human League at #38. The writer was flunking Algebra and requested the song to show that she's only human!